Home Construction Cave Creek AZ

Local resource for home construction in Cave Creek. Includes detailed information on local businesses that provide access to building contractors, home building, real estate agents, realtors, home improvement centers and home remodeling, as well as advice and content on homes and construction.

Nor'Easter Development, Llc
(602) 750-0546
27227 North Miller Road
Scottsdale, AZ

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Woodland Custom Beam Company
(480) 575-6758
4107 E. Ashler Hills Drive
Cave Creek, AZ
Services
Box Beams, Faux Beams, Alder Beams, Cedar Beams, and Wood Mantles.

Arizona Commercial & Residential Services
(602) 920-1406
21640 N 14th Ave.
Phoenix, AZ
 
Rock Stars of AZ
(623) 748-1022
2017 West Rose Garden Lane
Phoenix, AZ
Services
Stone Veneer

Design Pro Landscaping
(602) 818-7136
27406 N. 66th Ln
Peoria, AZ
 
LTC, Inc.
(480) 488-4796
P.O. Box 4136
Cave Creek, AZ
 
Chris Mellon & Company
(480) 575-6977
7509 East Cave Creek Rd
Carefree, AZ
 
Kowalski Construction Inc.
(602) 944-2645
2219 W. Melinda Ln.
Phoenix, AZ
 
Lincoln Air
(623) 587-9957
23309 N 17th Dr. Suit 122
Phoenix, AZ
Services
Air conditioning
Membership Organizations
Nest certified

PDA Electric, LLC
1527 W. Briles rd
Phoenix, AZ
 
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Basement bumps up home's resale value

Builders looking to meet the needs of homebuyers should start looking below ground level when constructing new homes, according to the National Association of Home Builders.

According to the “What 21st Century Home Buyers Want” survey of customer preferences conducted by the NAHB, the inclusion of basements in new homes has been on an upward rise since 2000. Homes being built on slabs are declining, as homeowners find more value in basements both during their occupancy of the home and at the time of resale.

“There’s nothing like a well-insulated basement that can serve as valuable living space to pop the eyes open of a potential homebuyer,” says Atlanta Realton Tina Fountain. “You can see the wheels start turning in a homebuyer’s mind as they quickly calculate what they can do with the ‘bonus space.’ A good basement takes the pressure off the other living areas in the home and opens up a world of possibilities for potential homebuyers.”

The survey says married couples with children and high-income households generally look for full basements. ...

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Improving on Nature

November 13, 2008
by  By Laura Glass and Mark Ward Sr.
Column plys run under a glue extruder at Timber Technologies in a process unique to the glulam industry.
Column plys run under a glue extruder at Timber Technologies in a process unique to the glulam industry.
Talk to any contractor and you’ll hear the same thing. There’s no guarantee when it comes to lumber.

On any given delivery, pieces can be warped or have knots that make them too weak for construction. The unusable wood must be recycled, dumped or resold at a loss. Thus many builders and lumber dealers are taking a look at engineered wood products as a way to contain costs and control overhead.

Though engineered wood has been on the market for half a century, technological advances have enabled manufacturers to improve quality, increase the number and variety of applications and offer more competitive prices. Still, the upfront cost of dimensional lumber remains less.

“But if you’re really comparing apples to apples, you must look at the total cost of the project,” says Steve Wozny, co-owner of Starwood Rafter in Independence, Wis., makers of glued laminated (glulam) timber arch rafters and beams. “You can save money by reducing labor costs, and you don’t need as much product because less framing is necessary.”

Ohio Timberland, a manufacturer of nail laminated columns in Stryker, Ohio, markets exclusively to the post-frame industry. President and engineer Mike Burkholder points out that, because “one of the greatest benefits of engineered products is their strength,” builders can do more with less.

Added strength also means more design flexibility, notes co-owner Tom Niska of Timber Technologies LLC, a maker of glulam columns and beams in Colfax, Wis.

“More people are using engineered wood products because they can do designs that weren’t possible before, while getting more bang for their buck,” Niska says. Though the homebuilding industry was initially the leader in the use of engineered products, he reports, now the post-frame sector is getting on board.

“It takes time for new products to gain acceptance, but we’re finding more unique and efficient ways to use engineered wood products,” agrees marketing manager Greg Wells of Weyerhaeuser, a manufacturer of residential building products based Boise, Idaho.

But Leo Shirek, manager of research and product development for Wick Building Systems in Mazomanie, Wis., says the trend toward increased use of engineered wood is unmistakable.

“In the early 1990s,” he observes, “engineered wood products started to become more popular. Since then, we’ve incorporated more of it into our product line. Also, increased usage of engineered wood helps forestry companies replace the larger-growth trees which have become depleted.”

The team at Graber Post Buildings in Montgomery, Ind., sees the post-frame industry from every angle. As sales manager Mark...

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